Blog Archives

Primitive Languages: linguistic determinism and the description of Aranda eighty years on

David Moore University of Western Australia Introduction The view that Australian Aboriginal languages are primitive endured into the twentieth century and is still widespread throughout the Australian community. ‘Primitive languages’ were a means of using linguistic evidence from a language to

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Posted in 19th century, 20th century, Australia, Grammars, History, Linguistics, Missionary Linguistics, Typology

Missionary linguistics and the German contribution to Central Australian language research and fieldwork 1890-1910

David Moore University of Western Australia Introduction This article explores the outstanding contribution of German Lutheran missionaries to linguistics, language documentation and translation in Aboriginal languages in Central Australia from the last decade of the nineteenth century to the years

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Posted in 19th century, 20th century, Australia, Field linguistics, History, Linguistics, Missionary Linguistics

German Lutheran Missionaries and the Linguistic Landscape of Central Australia 1890-1910

David Moore University of Western Australia My research aims to investigate documentation and research in the languages of Central Australia, providing a valid interpretation of the materials of the earliest work on the Aranda (Arrernte, Arrarnta) language of Central Australia.

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Posted in 19th century, Australia, Field linguistics, Grammars, History, Linguistics

SHLP4 Call for Papers

Society for the History of Linguistics in the Pacific SHLP4 The fourth biennial conference of the Society for the History of Linguistics in the Pacific will take place in Alice Springs, Australia, 22-23 September 2014. Papers on any aspect of

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Posted in Announcements

A uniform orthography and early linguistic research in Australia

David Moore University of Western Australia Introduction A Uniform orthography can be defined as one which is segmental and phonographic. Each graphic segment is pronounced and has a distinct value. Internal consistency in transcription is achieved by defining each segment

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Posted in 19th century, 20th century, Australia, Field linguistics, History, Linguistics, Phonology