Hiphilangsci update summer 2021

Dear colleagues,

With the northern summer now in full swing, let us aid in your aestivation with some recent delights from hiphilangsci.net. In the past year we have not only continued our tradition of scholarly blog posts, but also – like many in this age of lockdowns and quarantine – finally embraced the retrofuturistic dream of videophones and teleconferences. Join us on our audio-visual adventures in videos and podcasts.

Best regards,
Chloé Laplantine & James McElvenny

Hiphilangsci interviews:

Interview 1: 
The Owl of Minerva takes flight only when dusk begins to gather”
Inverview with Sylvain Auroux

Papers: 

Racialization, language science, and nineteenth century anthropometrics
by Margaret Thomas (Boston College)

Significs and Jacques van Ginneken
by Els Elffers (University of Amsterdam)

Death of a purist or how Dutch appeared to be a dangerous mother tongue
by Camiel Haman (University of Amsterdam/Adam Mickiewicz University Poznań)

The return of the human in the study of writing
by Piers Kelly (University of New England)

A Danish Framing of Roman Jakobson’s American Years – Review of From the early years of Phonology
by Patrick Flack (University of Fribourg)

Presentations:

History of Linguistics in East and South-East Asia
Quang Anh Le, Time-marking particles and the problem of grammatical categorisation in Vietnamese: From French colonialism to the post-Cold War era
Edward McDonald, Ma Jianzhong and the perils of being a pioneer

History of Linguistics in Australia
Jane Simpson, Grammars for analysis, grammars for learners
William McGregor, From Herman Nekes notebooks to Nekes & Worms 1853
David Moore, Developments in grammatical analysis of Central Australian languages 1890–1910

The Facts of Whorf’s Hopi Research
by Penny Lee

History and Philosophy of the Language Sciences Podcast :

Through short talks and interviews, the hiphilangsci podcast offers an overview of some of the main currents in disciplinary linguistics from the nineteenth century to the present. So far we’ve made it to the early twentieth century, and we’ll continue our journey with new episodes after the northern summer.

You can follow the podcast on Apple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, and wherever good podcasts are available.

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