Monthly Archives: May 2013

Theoretical linguistics and artificial languages

Alan Reed Libert University of Newcastle, New South Wales Mainstream theoretical linguists have generally ignored artificial languages, apparently considering them unworthy of attention. This is true not only of “fictional languages” such as Klingon, but also of “serious” languages such

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in Linguistics

The notion of stereotype in language study

Elena L. Vilinbakhova St. Petersburg State University 1. Introduction Originally, the word stereotype derives from two Ancient Greek roots: στερεός ‘solid’ and τύπος ‘impression’. It was first used by the French printer Firmin Didot in 1796 as a typographical term. Later,

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Linguistics, Semantics

Otto Jespersen and progress in international language

James McElvenny University of Sydney When it comes to expressing the ideas of our own day, the deficiencies of classical Latin appear with ruthless clarity: telephones and motor-cars and wireless have no room in Ciceronian Latin, and it will be

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in 19th century, 20th century, History, Linguistics

Greetings from the Orient: H.W. Ludolf as a central figure in 17th-cent. language study

Han Lamers (Leiden) & Toon Van Hal (Leuven) Leiden University and University of Leuven This post takes the reader to Ottoman Smyrna (Izmir in present-day Turkey) and Constantinople (now Istanbul) about 1700 A.D. Almost 250 years before, the Eastern-Roman, or

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in 17th century, Anatolia, Germany, History

On the history of the question of whether natural language is “illogical”

Barbara H Partee University of Massachusetts Amherst There have been centuries of study of logic and of language. Some philosophers and logicians have argued that natural language is logically deficient, or even that “natural language has no logic”. And before

Tagged with: , , , , ,
Posted in 20th century, History, Linguistics, Logical form, Semantics